What's New

Blog

By / 2.22.2018

This week, PPI Strategic Adviser Paul Bledsoe published a piece for The Hill exploring the dynamic between the United States and China when it comes to solar energy. According to Bledsoe, an examination of history suggests that “an element of global cooperation on energy technology among economic competitors may be necessary to address the existential […]

Blog

By / 2.21.2018

This week, Antwan Wilson stepped down as Chancellor of District of Columbia Public Schools after the majority of the 13-member D.C. City Council demanded his resignation for skirting the rules of the infamously competitive D.C. school lottery. Wilson ensured his daughter received a preferential transfer into the district’s highest-performing, non-selective traditional public school. To the […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 2.20.2018

Responses to President Trump’s imposition of tariffs on Chinese solar panels fall into two general camps. One holds that Chinese solar manufacturing subsidies are so egregious as to require U.S. tariffs to deter additional subsidies by Beijing. Others believe the action is really just free-trade political posturing by Trump, and in practice, amounts only to a […]

Blog

By / 2.20.2018

Distressingly, the labor share of income in the US has been on a long -term downward trend. Indeed, the labor share  is lower now than it was in 2006, before the last recession. Recent research has proposed that the labor share has fallen, in part, because market power has been increasing across the US economy. […]

Blog

By / 2.16.2018

Overall, 2017 was still a weak year for wage growth. In the private sector, real hourly wages for production and nonsupervisory workers rose only 0.2% in 2017, the slowest rate since 2012. However, production and nonsupervisory workers did do significantly better in some industries. The table below lists the top 2017 increases in real hourly […]

Project

The PPI Center on Funding America’s Future works to promote a fiscally responsible public investment agenda that fosters robust and inclusive economic growth. We tackle issues of public finance in the United States and offer innovative proposals to strengthen the foundation of our economy and build shared prosperity.

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Technological innovation is the main force driving job creation, productivity growth, and living standards. Progressives should aim to stimulate public and private investment in new enterprises and diffuse innovation across the entire economy.

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With Washington stalemated by partisanship and polarization, the most important governing innovations today are happening in America’s metro regions. PPI advocates for a new “progressive federalism” that decentralizes political power and resources to metro leaders.

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An open global economy boosts U.S. growth, supports good jobs, and enhances the buying power of American consumers. PPI advances policies that help American producers and workers to tap into global commerce, while assuring that trade’s substantial benefits are more broadly shared.

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America needs a 21st century model of public education geared to the knowledge economy. Charter schools are showing the way, because they provide autonomy for schools, accountability for results, and parental choice among schools tailored to the diverse learning styles of children. David Osborne’s book, Reinventing America’s Schools, explores the new paradigm of public education that is emerging to fit the realities of the 21st century.

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America’s civil justice system is a “public good” that should produce predictable, accurate and just results. The PPI Center for Civil Justice seeks to defend the integrity of our legal system from litigation abuse and efforts to bypass legislatures to make policy in the courts.

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Regulatory accumulation – the relentless layering of new rules atop old ones over decades – can smother economic innovation and investment. Continuously improving the regulatory environment for entrepreneurship and growth is integral to progressive efforts to make government work better.

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Government anti-poverty programs and charities must modernize the way they deliver social services. By embracing technological innovation, costly and time consuming bureaucratic barriers can be broken down and millions of disadvantaged Americans can become their own case managers.

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America must innovate its way to clean growth. Rejecting both climate denial and fantasies of 100 percent renewable power, we need a realistic transition to a low-carbon economy that taps next generation nuclear technology and carbon capture techniques as well as wind, solar and water power.