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Blog

By / 6.28.2017

PPI believes that the tech/telecom space is intensely competitive, not just in the United States but around the world.  We also believe that companies which are innovative and invest in new technologies and capabilities are providing great benefits to consumers and workers, including a fast-growing number of good jobs. From that perspective, we are strongly […]

Press Releases

By / 6.27.2017

WASHINGTON— The Progressive Policy Institute (PPI) today is pleased to announce multiple new hires to further develop its policy research firepower and grow its portfolio. Dane Stangler has joined PPI as Director of Policy Innovation, Paul Bledsoe has a new role as Strategic Adviser, and Emily Langhorne will serve as Education Policy Analyst. “PPI is […]

Blog

By / 6.23.2017

Michael Mandel, chief economic strategist at the Progressive Policy Institute, joined Alphachat to talk about his report, “The Coming Productivity Boom”, co-authored by Bret Swanson of Entropy Economics. Mandel argues that the decades-long productivity stagnation will end once companies in the “physical” industries — transportation, construction, manufacturing, healthcare, wholesale and retail trade — start investing […]

Blog

By / 6.18.2017

On June 7,  Axios  journalist Chris Matthews wrote a piece “Big Companies, Fewer Workers”  that said: The five most valuable companies in the U.S. are all technology firms that employ far fewer workers than their industrial predecessors. He echoes a common complaint. But is it really true? I decided to  compare employment at today’s most valuable […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 6.15.2017

Reasonable people can disagree about former President Barack Obama’s Race to the Top initiative – his multibillion education competition among states – but it was a big idea. So, too, were President Bill Clinton’s push for school standards and accountability, President George H.W. Bush’s push for national standards and President George W. Bush’s effort to […]

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Technological innovation is the main force driving job creation, productivity growth, and living standards. Progressives should aim to stimulate public and private investment in new enterprises and diffuse innovation across the entire economy.

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With Washington stalemated by partisanship and polarization, the most important governing innovations today are happening in America’s metro regions. PPI advocates for a new “progressive federalism” that decentralizes political power and resources to metro leaders.

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An open global economy boosts U.S. growth, supports good jobs, and enhances the buying power of American consumers. PPI advances policies that help American producers and workers to tap into global commerce, while assuring that trade’s substantial benefits are more broadly shared.

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America needs a 21st century model of public education geared to the knowledge economy. Charter schools are showing the way, because they provide autonomy for schools, accountability for results, and parental choice among schools tailored to the diverse learning styles of children.

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America’s civil justice system is a “public good” that should produce predictable, accurate and just results. The PPI Center for Civil Justice seeks to defend the integrity of our legal system from litigation abuse and efforts to bypass legislatures to make policy in the courts.

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Regulatory accumulation – the relentless layering of new rules atop old ones over decades – can smother economic innovation and investment. Continuously improving the regulatory environment for entrepreneurship and growth is integral to progressive efforts to make government work better.

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Government anti-poverty programs and charities must modernize the way they deliver social services. By embracing technological innovation, costly and time consuming bureaucratic barriers can be broken down and millions of disadvantaged Americans can become their own case managers.

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America must innovate its way to clean growth. Rejecting both climate denial and fantasies of 100 percent renewable power, we need a realistic transition to a low-carbon economy that taps next generation nuclear technology and carbon capture techniques as well as wind, solar and water power.